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Archive for March, 2012

Installing Xcode 3 and 4 side by side on Lion

March 19, 2012 10:59 am

Xcode 4 sucks so, so, bad. It kills my productivity like whoa. As a consequence, I’ve been doing most of my work in Xcode 3 on Snow Leopard, venturing into Xcode 4 only for testing and final releases. (I am currently working on a code library that’s used by other iOS programmers, most of whom will be using Xcode 4.)

I know I’ll have to update to Xcode 4, eventually. I can’t hold back time forever. But the longer I wait, the more likely it is that Apple will fix all the glaring issues. Until then, I’m going to cling to Xcode 3 for dear life.

Recently, Apple made things a little more difficult for me by releasing a new version of Xcode 4 that only works on Lion. So I had to update my operating system, finally. But I found a way to install both Xcode 3 and Xcode 4 side by side, without any real problems.

My new Lion setup works better than Snow Leopard did in one significant respect: Xcode 3 is now able to install and debug programs on devices running iOS 5.0 and 5.1, which didn’t work for me before. I’m assuming it’s using device debugging stuff that Xcode 4 installed, but I’m not sure. I’m just glad it works, because I use it a lot.

Here’s the steps I took, which might work for you as well.

Step 0: Remove all existing Xcode versions

I’m assuming you are starting from a fresh install of Lion, which doesn’t contain any developer tools at all. If not, the instructions given here probably won’t work. The order of installation is important.

This command should work to uninstall Xcode 3:

sudo /Developer/Library/uninstall-devtools –mode=all

And this one will uninstall Xcode 4:

sudo /Library/Developer/Shared/uninstall-devtools –mode=all

… then remove Xcode.app from your /Applications folder.

Step 1: Install Xcode 3.2.6

As of this writing, the most recent version of Xcode 3 is still available from Apple’s developer site. Download Xcode 3.2.6, which will require you to log in with your Apple dev credentials.

Alas, Xcode 3 doesn’t really want to be installed on Lion. No matter, its version checks can be defeated. I found out how to make it work from this link. I’ll repeat the instructions here, in case that link goes dead:

1. Mount the Xcode 3.2.6 DMG
2. Open Terminal
3. Enter these commands:

export COMMAND_LINE_INSTALL=1
open "/Volumes/Xcode and iOS SDK/Xcode and iOS SDK.mpkg"

… then run the installation program as usual.

Partway through, the Xcode 3 installer demanded that I shut down iTunes, even though it wasn’t running. On a hunch, I used Activity Monitor to kill iTunes Helper, and that did indeed make it shut up and finish installing.

If you want to create a link to Xcode 3, the app is installed here by default:

/Developer/Applications/Xcode.app

Drag it from that location into the Dock or wherever else you’d like it to be.

After Xcode 3 is installed, you’ll want to launch it to make sure it really works. On my system, Lion declared that it needed to download a Java runtime before this was possible.

Step 2: Install Xcode 4.3.1

Apple has decided to move Xcode 4 into the Mac App Store, so you’ll have to run the App Store app to download it. It doesn’t have an installer like earlier Xcode versions, it’s just a plain old app in your /Applications folder. Start it, and it will declare that it has to install a framework first, so let it do that.

At this point, you’ve got a cosmetic problem: the Xcode 3 and Xcode 4 icons are identical. You can solve that problem by installing Jeff LaMarche’s replacement icon. He wrote that article for a much older version of Xcode 4, but the replacement worked just fine for me.

Step 3: Install the command line tools

Xcode 4 no longer installs command-line tools by default. Assuming you need them, like I do, then you should open the Xcode 4 preferences window, go to the Downloads tab, look for the item labeled “Command Line Tools,” and press the Install button. This will take just a few minutes, and the tools will be installed, inside the Xcode 4 application bundle.

The next problem you’ll discover is that, if you fire up a terminal window and type a command such as xcodebuild, you’ll get the Xcode 3 command line tools by default. That is not what I want. So the next step is to modify your .profile file, or whatever you normally use to control the PATH environment variable, and add these paths near the beginning:

/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/Tools
/Applications/Xcode.app/Contents/Developer/usr/bin

Step 4: Device debugging

If you’re like me, you have a pile of devices you use for testing and debugging. Both Xcode 4 and Xcode 3 are able to install and debug apps on all my devices, which are running versions of iOS from 3.1 to 5.1.

The trick is to start on Xcode 4. Connect your device to the 30-pin connector, open Xcode 4, and look in the Organizer window. If this is the first time you’ve connected this device, it will ask you if you want to use it for debugging, and it may have to download some files to make that possible. Eventually, the little LED next to the device should turn green. After that, exit Xcode 4, open Xcode 3, and try it there. It looks like Xcode 3 copies some files from wherever Xcode 4 stashed them, and then it’s off to the races.

Aftermath

I’ve been using this setup for a number of months now. What I’ve discovered is that Xcode 3 is unfortunately pretty crippled when run on Lion. Debugging via GDB is impossible. Source code windows often have bogus titles applied. Various other cosmetic bugs abound. In short, Xcode 3 is not nearly as pleasant to use as it was on Snow Leopard. But it’s still better than Xcode 4, for the most part, in my opinion. So I soldier on.

And … fin

As of this writing, it is now a few months later, and I use Xcode 4 all the time. I still don’t like it, but there are way too many things that Xcode 3 can’t do anymore, and switching back and forth all the time is giving me a headache.

I did save the Xcode 3 versions of Pixie and Property List Editor, however. You can download a more recent version of Pixie from Apple’s developer site, but it’s not as good as the old one, and the icon is uglier. With Xcode 4, you’re expected to edit property lists within the IDE itself, but that’s often not very convenient. If you’re going to follow my lead, be aware that Property List Editor won’t work without PlistEdit.framework, which is installed in your /Developer folder along with all the other Xcode 3 stuff.

And with that, I am officially giving up the fight. You win, Apple. I sure wish Steve J. had been forced to use Xcode as much as I do. I bet it wouldn’t have turned out like this.